Submissions

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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • I have read the Information for Authors and about the peer review process for Current Oncology.
  • It is understood by the submitting authorship that some manuscripts will be selected to be published in “online-only” format. These decisions are based on the available print pages, and do not reflect the importance of a particular article. All online-only articles are published in full, with a DOI (digital object identifier), and are fully indexed. They will also be listed in the Table of Contents of the hard copy.
  • Submission files are prepared in the correct format:

    1. Main manuscript format: At least line-an-a-half spacing throughout, including the references and figure legends. The submission file is in Microsoft Word document file format.

    2. Tables: Are formatted using the table tool in a word processing program. All tables (including associated title and legend) appear in consecutive numerical order after the references in the main manuscript file. All tables will be inserted into the correct place during the layout stage.

    3. Figures: Must be submitted as separate files (Step 3 of submission process) in accepted format and not embedded in the manuscript.
    4. Supplemental Material: Supplemental material, with the exception of audio and video, should be submitted in a single Word document. The first page of the document must be the journal’s standard cover page, which can be downloaded from the Submission Library. All supplemental material files are to be uploaded in Step 3 of the online submission process.
    5. References must be in the correct format. Articles that are not in the correct format will be sent back to author for correction, which will result in the delay of publication of your article.

  • By submitting to the journal, the author(s) hereby agree that the submission follows the journals policies on Authorship, Conflict of Interest, Informed Consent, and Human and Animal Rights which are sourced in turn from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors ("Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals").
  • The submission has not been previously published nor is it before another journal for consideration; nor will it be until after such time as the manuscript has either been withdrawn from further consideration or it has been decided that the manuscript will not be published in Current Oncology or an explanation has been provided to the Editor and written permission obtained.
  • Author Fees: It is understood that an Article Processing Fees (APF) and Extra Page Charge (EPC) is payable for articles accepted for publication in Current Oncology. The APF is $800.00 CAD, which includes up to four black & white published pages. An EPC of $150.00 CAD per black & white page will apply for each additional published page over four pages. Guest editorials, cancer narratives, invited commentaries and letters to the editor are exempt from paying this fee. For supplemental material submitted to accompany an article for online-only publication, the author will be charged a fee of $350.00 CAD per file, which will be invoiced with Extra Page Charges. For more information on Author Fees, and frequently asked questions, please click here. Please note the following:
    1. Separate publication fees apply to meeting reports, proceedings and meeting abstracts. For a quote or more information contact Karen Irwin (E-mail: Karen_cancerkn@multi-med.com, Phone: 905-875-2456).
    2. The payment of the Article Processing Fee (APF) or Extra Page Charge (EPC) does not determine in which format your article will be published. It is at the discretion of the editor whether your article is published in full in both print and online, or published in online only format.
    3. Author Fee waivers or discounts are granted on a case-by-case basis to authors who lack funds. To apply for a waiver or discount, please complete and return the author fee waiver form within six weeks of manuscript submission.
    4. Current Oncology offers authors optional Fast Track Publication Author Fee Premiums. Upon acceptance, the article will be published within 2-4 months. Please visit “About Fast Track Publication” for more information.
    5. To help determine the approximate author fees for an article, please send an email to current_oncology@multi-med.com for an estimated published page count. Please provide your full article in word document format, along with any figures and tables. If the manuscript has already been submitted, please provide the manuscript title or ID. Please note an accurate page count of your article and the associated fees can only be determined once the article is in final PDF galley format.

  • At least three potential reviewers (name, affiliation and email address) have been provided in the completed “Suggested Reviewer Form”. The authors understand that Editors reserve the right to choose all reviewers. The completed form is to be submitted as a separate file in Step 3 of the submission process.


  • Manuscript Submission Form (click to download form) MUST be completed by the corresponding author and submitted as a separate file in Step 3 of the submission process.




Author Guidelines

About the Journal

Overview of Current Oncology
What we publish
Benefits of publishing with Current Oncology

Overview of Current Oncology

Current Oncology is a peer-reviewed, Canadian-based and internationally respected journal. Current Oncology represents a multidisciplinary medium encompassing health care workers in the field of cancer therapy in Canada to report upon and to review progress in the management of this disease.

What we publish

We encourage submissions from all fields of cancer medicine, including radiation oncology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, pediatric oncology, pathology, and cancer rehabilitation and survivorship. For a complete list of article areas that we publish, please visit http://www.current-oncology.com/index.php/oncology/about/submissions#JournalSections. Articles published in the journal typically contain information that is relevant directly to clinical oncology practice, and have clear potential for application to the current or future practice of cancer medicine.

Benefits of publishing with Current Oncology

  • Articles are freely and permanently accessible online immediately upon publication
  • Distributed in print gratis to the Canadian oncology community
  • Published articles are sent to and immediately available in PubMed Central (PMC)
  • Impact factor of 2.048, as published in the 2017 Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition
  • Is covered by the following major indexing services:
    • MEDLINE
    • PubMed/PubMed Central
    • Embase
    • Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch)
    • Journal Citation Reports/Science Edition
    • EBSCOhost.com Research Databases
    • CrossRef
    • DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)
    • Index Copernicus
    • Scopus
  • Authors are granted specific rights for a large number of author uses

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Peer Review Policy

All manuscripts are initially reviewed by the editorial staff, and if appropriate, will be assigned to a section editor. If the paper is judged to be suitable for possible publication, it will be sent to two or more external reviewers using our database of experts. All articles undergo this process with the following exceptions, which do not undergo our standard review process:

  • Letters to the Editor, Commentaries and Editorials are based on the decision of the Editor, who may ask experts on the merit of their contents.
  • Practices Guidelines/Consensus Statements - Special considerations may be made in this case as they are typically authored by experts in the field. The authors of the manuscript are asked to sign a form stating they have approved the manuscript and it is acceptable for publication. If they choose not to sign this, they must provide a list of five potential reviewers to review the manuscript, and the article will go through our standard peer review process. The Editors reserve the right to choose all reviewers and may not necessarily select reviewers from the list provided.
  • Meeting Reports – based on the decision of the Editor.
  • Special Articles – depending on the format and content, special articles may be solely based on the decision of the Editor, or undergo our standard review process.

At time of submission, authors are requested to provide at least three potential reviewers (name, affiliation and email address), who could, in their opinion, expertly review their manuscripts. The Editors, however, reserve the right to choose all reviewers. These reviewers should not have published with any of the co-authors during the past five years and should not currently work or collaborate with one of the institutes of the co-authors of the submitted manuscript.

Current Oncology employs a single-blind review process. The identities of the reviewers are kept confidential, but the identity of the author or authors is made known to the reviewers. The manuscript under review is not revealed to anyone other than the reviewers and editorial staff. Reviewers are required to maintain confidentiality about the manuscripts they review. Authors should expect to receive an initial decision on their manuscript within 2–6 weeks of submission. If revision of the manuscript is required, the authors must submit within three weeks of the request.

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Types of Submissions

Outlined below are the types of submissions accepted to Current Oncology. For further details about the requirements of each article type, view the “Instructions for Submissions” section.

Please note: Below are ONLY guidelines that authors should follow. The suggested word, table and figure counts for an article are provided to keep manuscripts at a length that will maintain the interest of our reviewers and readership. Article Processing Fee (APF) and Extra Page Charges (EPC) will apply to all manuscripts including; original articles, review articles, case reports, commentaries, practice guidelines and consensus statements, short communication, perspectives in oncology articles, and solicited commentaries. The APF is $800.00 CDN, which includes up to four black & white published pages. EPC of $150.00 CDN per b&w page will apply for each additional published page over four pages. Letters to the editor, editorials, cancer narratives, and invited guest editorials are exempt from paying this fee.

To help determine the approximate author fees for an article, please send an email to current_oncology@multi-med.com for an estimated published page count. Please provide your full article in word document format, along with any figures and tables. If the manuscript has already been submitted, please provide the manuscript title or ID. Please note an accurate page count of your article and the associated fees can only be determined once the article is in final PDF galley format.

Article Type

Description

Suggested Word Count Limit

Other

Peer Reviewed
(Yes or No)

Original Articles

Investigations and original research that represent new and significant contributions and advances to the field of oncology

3000–4000

4–6 Tables/figures and a limit of 50 references where appropriate

Yes

Review Articles

Reviews of major areas or sub-areas in the field of oncology. Describe new developments, summarize progress, or analyze published evidence

3000–4000

4–6 Tables/figures and a suggested 75-reference limit.

Yes

Editorials

Comments from recognized experts on a specific topic, and related to an article published in the same issue. Editorials are generally solicited by the Editorial team

1500

1–2 Tables/figures and 4–8 references

No

Commentaries

Opinions/views of recognized experts on a specific topic. Commentaries are unrelated to a specific article and provide an opinion or view on an oncology related topic. Commentaries can address various controversial and timely issues in oncology

2000

1–2 tables/figures and 4–8 references

No

Practice Guidelines

Clinical guidelines and consensus statements

4000

4–6 Tables/figures and a suggested 50-reference limit

Consensus Guidelines are normally authored by experts. The authors on the manuscript are asked to sign a form stating they have approved the manuscript and it is acceptable for publication. If they choose not to sign this, they must provide a list of five potential reviewers to review the manuscript.

Letters to the Editor

Comments on papers previously published in Current Oncology or on any other matters of interest to Oncology

500–750

Should not have tables or figures, and no more than 5 references

No

Perspectives in Oncology

Discuss significant topics and controversies relevant to oncology. These articles are typically from a more personal or opinion-based standpoint than a Review Article

2500

4–6 Tables/figures and a suggested 50-reference limit

Yes

Short Communications

Brief reports of preliminary or limited results of original research, observations, or case series on the causes, mechanisms, diagnosis, course, treatment, and prevention of cancer

1500

1–2 Tables/figures and 15–20 references

Yes

Case Reports

Reports on oncology-specific cases

1500

3–4 Tables/figures and 25 references

Yes

Meeting Reports Reports should focus on the key developments presented and discussed at the Oncology related meeting

1500-3500

3–4 Tables/figures and 25 references

No

Cancer Narratives: Words Beyond Disease

Articles should focus on issues or themes of general relevance from a personal or unique perspective. Creative writing with a cancer-related theme, as well as descriptions of struggles, conflicts, joys and emotions encountered in clinical practice are encouraged.

1500

2 Tables/figures (if required), and no more than 8 references (if required)

Yes

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Instructions for Submissions

Original articles
Review articles
Editorials
Commentaries
Practice guidelines
Letters to the Editor
Perspectives in oncology
Short communications
Case reports
Meeting reports
Cancer Narratives: Words Beyond Disease

Please note: Below are ONLY guidelines that authors should follow. The suggested word, table and figure counts for an article are provided to keep manuscripts at a length that will maintain the interest of our reviewers and readership. Article Processing Fee (APF) and Extra Page Charges (EPC) will apply to all manuscripts including; original articles, review articles, case reports, practice guidelines and consensus statements, short communication, perspectives in oncology articles, and solicited commentaries. The APF is $800.00 CDN, which includes up to four black & white published pages. EPC of $150.00 CDN per b&w page will apply for each additional published page over four pages. Letters to the editor, editorials, cancer narratives, commentaries and invited guest editorials are exempt from paying this fee.

To help determine the approximate author fees for an article, please send an email to current_oncology@multi-med.com for an estimated published page count. Please provide your full article in word document format, along with any figures and tables. If the manuscript has already been submitted, please provide the manuscript title or ID. Please note an accurate page count of your article and the associated fees can only be determined once the article is in final PDF galley format.

Original articles

Original articles describe investigations and original research that represent new and significant contributions and advances in the oncology field. Submissions from all fields are welcome (see Journal Sections listing for further details).

Instructions:

  • Total word count (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures) should not exceed 4000 words
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed 6
  • Suggested limit of 50 references and should be limited to recent works

Review articles

Review articles examine major areas or sub-areas in the field of oncology. The purpose is to describe new developments, summarize progress or analyze published evidence.

Instructions:

  • Total word count (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures) should not exceed 4000 words
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed six
  • Suggested limit of 75 references

Editorials

Editorials are most often solicited by the Editors, and are related to an article published in the same issue. They express the opinions and views of recognized experts on a specific topic.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 1500 words (excluding references and text for tables and figures)
  • No abstract
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed two
  • Limit of 8 references
  • Limited or no subheadings within the body of the manuscript

Commentaries

Commentaries are most often solicited by the Editors, and are not related to a specific article. They express the opinions and views of recognized experts on a specific topic. The commentary format may be used for ongoing dialogues, discussions of controversial issues, or subjective articles of interest in any field of oncology.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 2000 words (excluding references and text for tables and figures)
  • No abstract
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed 2
  • Limit of 8 references
  • Limited or no subheadings within the body of the manuscript

Practice guidelines

Clinical practice guidelines and published statements, intended to guide clinical and patient care (for example, Guidelines, Recommendations, Consensus Statements, and Position Papers).

Instructions:

  • Total word count (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures) should not exceed 4000 words
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed 6
  • Suggested limit of 50 references
  • The “Author declaration of acceptance/suggested reviewer form” form must be completed and submitted with the manuscript.

Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor should comment on work previously published in Current Oncology. Letters must be submitted within one month of the online publication date of the article discussed in order to be considered. Their publication is based only on the decision of the Editor, who occasionally asks experts on the merit of the contents. The Editors may invite a reply to the letter by the original author. The Editor may consider publication of a letter that comments on other matters of interest to Oncology. This section is not considered to be an appropriate venue for publishing new data without peer review. Studies with scientific merit should be considered for submission as an Original Article or Short Communication.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 750
  • No tables or figures are to be included
  • Limit of 5 references

Perspectives in oncology

These articles discuss significant topics and controversies relevant to oncology. These articles are typically from a more personal or opinion-based standpoint than a Review Article. Perspectives should state the topic and background information concisely, discuss opposing viewpoints, and make recommendations for further investigations or actions. Interested authors should correspond with the Editor prior to submission to discuss the suitability of the proposed subject matter.

Instructions:

  • Total word count (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures) should not exceed 2500 words
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed 4
  • Suggested limit of 50 references

Short communications

These articles are brief reports of preliminary or limited results of original research, observations, or case series on the causes, mechanisms, diagnosis, course, treatment, and prevention of cancer.

Instructions:

  • Total word count (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures) should not exceed 1500 words
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words and must not contain headings
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed 3
  • Suggested limit of 20 references

Case reports

Case report articles report on oncology-specific cases. Cases will typically be judged on clinical interest and educational value to the oncology field and NOT novelty or rarity.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 1500 (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures)
  • Include an unstructured abstract of no more than 250 words that summarizes the report
  • Include a concise overview describing the case and brief literature review
  • Limit of 4 tables or figures
  • Limit of 25 references

Meeting reports

Reports should focus on key developments presented and discussed at an Oncology related meeting.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 3500 (excluding abstract, references and text for tables and figures).
  • Abstract should be no longer than 250 words
  • Total number of tables and figures and tables should not exceed four
  • Suggested limit of 25 references

Cancer Narratives: Words Beyond Disease

Submissions to 'Cancer Narratives' are welcomed from all members of the cancer care community and should focus on issues or themes of general relevance from a personal or unique perspective. Creative writing with a cancer-related theme, as well as descriptions of struggles, conflicts, joys and emotions encountered in clinical practice, potentially resonating with the broader cancer care community, including patients and their loved ones, are strongly encouraged.

Submissions from learners at all levels, as well as anyone involved with cancer care including nurses, supportive care providers and pharmacists, for example, are welcomed. Personal perspectives from patients and their loved ones are also encouraged.

Instructions:

  • Total word count should not exceed 1500 words
  • No abstract required
  • If required, total number of tables and figures should not exceed two
  • Limit of 8 references (if required)

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Journal Sections

For all Original Articles authors will be asked to select one of the applicable sub-sections upon article submission:

  • Biomarkers in Oncology
  • Biomedical Ethics
  • Bone and Soft Tissue Oncology
  • Cancer Control and Prevention
  • Cancer Genetics
  • Cancer Rehabilitation and Survivorship
  • Clinical Trials
  • Geriatric Oncology
  • Immuno-Oncology
  • Integrative Oncology
  • Knowledge Translation*
  • Medical Economics
  • Medical Legal
  • Medical Oncology
  • Nursing
  • Nutrition
  • Oncofertility
  • Oncologic Pathology
  • Oncology Education
  • Palliative Oncology
  • Pediatric Oncology
  • Psychosocial Oncology
  • Radiation Oncology
  • Surgical Oncology
  • Translational Research
  • Urologic Oncology

* Articles submitted to the Knowledge Translation section must follow the format as outlined in the Manuscript Preparation Guidelines

Other journal sections include:

  • Case Reports
  • Cancer Narratives: Words Beyond Disease
  • Commentaries (Includes Updates and Developments in Oncology - a standing series of commentaries invited by the editors of the section Drs. Phil Gold and Richard Ablin)
  • Guest Editorials
  • Letters to the Editor
  • Meeting Abstracts
  • Meeting Reports
  • Perspectives in Oncology
  • Practice Guidelines
  • Review Articles
  • Short Communications
  • Special Articles

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Authors' Professional and Ethical Responsibilities

Authorship
Sources of support
Conflict of interest
Duplicate publication and concurrent submission
Informed consent
Human and animal rights

Current Oncology follows the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ (ICMJE) Recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals, which can be found at http://www.icmje.org/.

Authorship

Only those persons who contributed directly to the intellectual content of the paper should be listed as authors. Based on the ICMJE recommendations, Authors should meet all of the following criteria:

  1. Substantial contributions to the conception or design of the work; or the acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data for the work; AND
  2. Drafting the work or revising it critically for important intellectual content; AND
  3. Final approval of the version to be published; AND
  4. Agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

Holding positions of administrative leadership, contributing patients, and collecting and assembling data, are not, by themselves, criteria for authorship. Other persons who have made substantial, direct contributions to the work but cannot be considered authors should be listed in the Acknowledgments section. Examples of those who might be acknowledged include a person who provided purely technical help, writing assistance, or a department chair who provided only general support. Because acknowledgment may imply endorsement by acknowledged individuals of a study’s data and conclusions, the corresponding author must obtain written permission to be acknowledged from all acknowledged individuals.

When a large multi-author group has conducted the work, the group ideally should decide who will be an author before the work is started and confirm who is an author before submitting the manuscript for publication. All members of the group named as authors should meet all four criteria for authorship, including approval of the final manuscript, and they should be able to take public responsibility for the work and should have full confidence in the accuracy and integrity of the work of other group authors. They will also be expected as individuals to provide conflict-of-interest disclosures.

When a large, multi-centre group has conducted the work, the group should identify the individuals who accept direct responsibility for the manuscript. These individuals should fully meet the criteria for authorship defined above. When submitting a group author manuscript, the corresponding author should clearly indicate the preferred citation and should clearly identify all individual authors as well as the group name. Other members of the group should be listed in the acknowledgements. The National Library of Medicine indexes the group name and the names of individuals the group has identified as being directly responsible for the manuscript.

Role of the Corresponding Author

The corresponding author is the one individual who takes primary responsibility for communication with the journal during the manuscript submission, peer review, and publication process. Only one author can be the corresponding author. The role of the corresponding author is to:

  • meet submission requirements and submit the manuscript to the journal
  • ensure all authors have reviewed and approved the final version of the manuscript prior to submission
  • ensure that all of the journal’s administrative requirements are met – including submission of all required forms
  • ensure the journal’s ethical policies are met —the corresponding author must complete and upload our manuscript submission form with their submission, which acknowledges their understanding of our policies
  • distribute decision letters, reviewer comments, and other messages from the journal, and distribute proofs among coauthors for review
  • return corrections and ensure that all authors approve each version of the article
  • be available after publication to respond to critiques of the work and cooperate with any requests from the journal for data or additional information should questions about the paper arise after publication.

Sources of support

Sources of outside support for research, including funding, grants, equipment, and drugs, must be named in the title page and in the Acknowledgment statement. The role of the funding organization, if any, in the collection of data, its analysis and interpretation, and in the right to approve or disapprove publication of the finished manuscript must be described in the Methods section of the text.

Any involvement of medical writers/researchers, particularly those employed or supported by the pharmaceutical industry, in the writing of an article must be clearly defined and disclosed and also included in the Acknowledgment statement.

You are requested to identify who provided financial support for the conduct of the research and/or preparation of the article and to briefly describe the role of the sponsor(s), if any, in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the article for publication. If the funding source(s) had no such involvement then this should be stated.

Conflict of interest

Public trust in the scientific process and the credibility of published articles depend in part on how transparently conflicts of interest are handled during the planning, implementation, writing, peer review, editing, and publication of scientific work. A conflict of interest exists when professional judgment concerning a primary interest (such as patients' welfare or the validity of research) may be influenced by a secondary interest (such as financial gain). Perceptions of conflict of interest are as important as actual conflicts of interest.

Financial relationships (such as employment, consultancies, stock ownership or options, honoraria, patents, and paid expert testimony) are the most easily identifiable conflicts of interest and the most likely to undermine the credibility of the journal, the authors, and of science itself. However, conflicts can occur for other reasons, such as personal relationships or rivalries, academic competition, and intellectual beliefs. Agreements between authors and study sponsors that interfere with the authors’ access to all of a study’s data or that interfere with their ability to analyze and interpret the data and to prepare and publish manuscripts independently may represent conflicts of interest, and should be avoided.

All authors must disclose if any conflict of interest exists, or declare if they have none. The Conflict of Interest Disclosure is required for all manuscripts and will be published. It is the responsibility of the corresponding author to ensure that all co-authors adhere to this policy and to confirm whether they have any conflicts to declare.

The following statement must be included in your submitted manuscript file at the end of text, before the references section, under the heading “Conflict of Interests Disclosure”.

“I/We have read and understood Current Oncology’s policy on conflicts of interest disclosure and declare the following interests: [list them or state that you have none].”

Examples:

No competing interests

“We have read and understood Current Oncology’s policy on disclosing conflicts of interest and declare that we have none”

Competing interests disclosed

“We have read and understood Current Oncology’s policy on disclosing conflicts of interest and declare the following interests: AA has received speaker fees from BBB company. CC has received fees as an advisory board member for DDD company. EE’s institution receives funding from FFF company for a trial in which he is co-investigator."

In order to assist authors in the formation of their disclosure statements, and to help standardize authors ’ disclosures across journals, we recommend that all authors download and complete a copy of the disclosure form, which is available as a PDF at http://www.icmje.org/conflicts-of-interest/. It is not mandatory to complete this form, but encouraged. A summary statement derived from the information provided in section 6 of the form can be provided to the corresponding author, and will be included in the published article.

Duplicate publication and concurrent submission

Duplicate publication is publication of a paper that overlaps substantially with one already published, without clear, visible reference to the previous publication. On the title page, give full details on any possible previous or duplicate publication of any content of the paper. Any reference to or use of previously published material must be explicitly acknowledged in the manuscript and the authors must obtain permissions where necessary. Previous publication of a small fraction of the content of a paper does not necessarily preclude it from being published, but the Editors need information about previous publication when deciding how to use space in the Journal efficiently; they regard failure of full disclosure by authors of possible prior publication as a breach of scientific ethics. Please send a copy of any document that might be considered a previous publication.

Duplicate or redundant submission is the same manuscript (or the same data) that is submitted to different journals at the same time. International copyright laws, ethical conduct, and cost effective use of resources require that readers can be assured that what they are reading is original. Manuscripts that are submitted to Current Oncology should not have been previously published or under consideration elsewhere.

Authors should be advised that Multimed is a member of CrossCheck’s plagiarism detection initiative, and uses software to randomly scan accepted articles for duplication of text from previously published sources. Editors may also initiate a scan of any submitted manuscript during the review process, if duplicate publication or text recycling (self-plagiarism of an author’s own publications) is suspected. Any article displaying more than a 15% level of duplication (excluding references) will be investigated and further action will be decided upon by the Editor on a case-by-case basis. Editors handle cases according to the guidelines outlined by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) (http://publicationethics.org/) for duplicate publication and plagiarism.

Informed consent

Patients have a right to privacy that should not be infringed without informed consent. Identifying information, including patients' names, initials, or hospital numbers, should not be published in written descriptions, photographs, and pedigrees unless the information is essential for scientific purposes and the patient (or parent or guardian) gives written informed consent for publication. Informed consent for this purpose requires that a patient who is identifiable be shown the manuscript to be published. Authors should disclose to these patients whether any potential identifiable material might be available via the Internet as well as in print after publication. Identifying details should be omitted if they are not essential. Informed consent should be obtained if there is any doubt that anonymity can be maintained. For example, masking the eye region in photographs of patients is inadequate protection of anonymity. If identifying characteristics are altered to protect anonymity, such as in genetic pedigrees, authors should provide assurance that the alterations do not distort the scientific purpose. When appropriate, authors must state in the Methods section the procedure used to ensure adherence to ethical guidelines on informed consent and should affirm that such consent was obtained.

If your article contains a case description of an individual patient, you must confirm on submission that you have obtained fully informed, voluntary and written consent to publish from the patient. If the patient is deceased or incapable of providing informed consent, you should have obtained consent from their next-of-kin, beneficiary or legal guardian.

Human and animal rights

When reporting experiments on human subjects, authors should indicate whether the procedures followed accord with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2008. If doubt exists whether the research was conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration, the authors must explain the rationale for their approach and demonstrate that the institutional review body explicitly approved the doubtful aspects of the study. When reporting experiments on animals, authors should indicate whether the institutional and national guide for the care and use of laboratory animals was followed.

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Manuscript Preparation Guidelines

In addition to the preparation guidelines provided, authors may refer to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)'s "Manuscript Preparation" guidelines for additional advice on appropriate manuscript preparation.

Structure and Presentation
Title Page
Abstract and key words
Text
References
Figures
Tables
Supplemental Material
Reporting Guidelines

Structure and Presentation

Write the body of the manuscript as concisely as possible, adhering to the word limits specified for the given manuscript category. Use at least line-and-a-half spacing throughout, including in the references and figure legends.

For section and subsection headings, please use the heading styles built into your word processing template. Headings are unumbered, and stand alone to a maximum of three levels:

LEVEL ONE HEADING
Level 2 Heading
Level 3 Heading

If further divisions of the text are required, use inline headings:

In-line Heading Level One: Paragraph text ....
In-line Heading Level Two: Paragraph text ....

Focus on the content rather than the look of a submission. Simpler is always better. Use a common typeface such as Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, or Times in a readable size (11 or 12 points is usually adequate). In running text, formatting other than the usual uses of italic, superscript, and subscript is discouraged. During the copyediting process all extraneous formatting will, in any case, be stripped from the file to ensure smooth intake into the layout program used by the page compositor.

All papers must contain the following items, when applicable:

The linked sections provide further instructions for preparation of these items.

Title Page

The first page of the manuscript should set out

  1. the title of the article (80 characters maximum, using sentence case).
  2. the names of the authors (written as initials and surname), with academic degree(s) attained. Omit “candidate,” “fellow,” and “diplomate” designations, but include “registered” designations. Correct: J.A. Smith MD, P. Jones MSc, T. Ryan RD. Incorrect: J.A. Smith MD FRCP, P. Jones PhD(Cand).
  3. the affiliation or affiliations for each author. For each affiliation, include the name of the department (if any), the institution, the city, and the province (if Canada, using the official postal abbreviation) or the state (U.S.A.) and country where the work was done. Link the authors to their designations using these characters in the order shown: * (asterisk, never superscripted) † (superscript dagger) ‡ (superscript double dagger) § (superscript section mark) || (superscript double bar) # (superscript octothorpe). For the seventh and subsequent affiliations (if needed), use the same characters in the same sequence, but paired—that is, ** †† ‡‡ and so on.
  4. a shortened version of the title for use as a running header (no more than 60 characters, upper case).
  5. the usual full name of the corresponding author, with postal address, e-mail address, and fax and telephone numbers.
  6. acknowledgments of grant support and of individuals who were of direct help in the preparation of the study or the manuscript.
  7. source or sources of support in the form of grants, equipment, drugs, or all of these.
  8. full details on any possible previous or duplicate publication of any content of the paper (if applicable).
  9. a word count for the text only (excluding abstract, acknowledgments, figure legends, and references).
  10. the number of figures and tables.

Abstract and key words

Include a structured abstract of no more than 250 words for original and review articles. Use these subheadings:

  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions (or Summary)

For other major manuscripts, include an unstructured abstract of no more than 250 words that summarizes the objective, main points, and conclusions of the article. Abstracts are not required for editorials, commentaries, and letters to the editor.

After the abstract, list up to eight key words or phrases for journal (not library database) indexing. A list of key words is required for all submissions except editorials and commentaries. Present the key words in one paragraph, separated by commas, with no terminal punctuation.

Text

Organization
Spelling
Abbreviations
Units of Measurement
Dates and Times
Special Characters
Proprietary and Generic Names
Use of English Language

Organization

Organize the text using the applicable structure from the list set out here.

For review and original articles:

  • Introduction (or Background)
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions (or Summary)
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of Interest Disclosures
  • References
  • Appendices (optional)
  • Figure Legends
  • Tables

For Knowledge Translation articles:

  • Background
    What is the specific knowledge-to-practice gap that the project was designed to address; what were the specific objectives of the project; what knowledge translation theory, model, or framework was used to inform the project?
  • Implementation
    What was the specific knowledge translation strategy that was developed and implemented to meet the objectives; how was the project evaluated (describe the specific measures); what were the results of the evaluation; was an economic evaluation undertaken?
  • Discussion
    What conclusions were drawn from the evaluation (if not successful, why not); was a decision taken to continue or to abandon the activity; what might have been done differently; are the results generalizable to other cancer control domains or other jurisdictions in Canada; is the project sustainable?
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of Interest Disclosures
  • References
  • Appendices (optional)
  • Figure Legends
  • Tables

For Short Communications:

For Case Reports:

  • Introduction (optional)
  • Case Description
  • Discussion
  • Conclusions (or Summary)
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflict of Interest Disclosures
  • References
  • Figure Legends
  • Tables

For examples of Practice Guidelines, Cancer Narratives, and Meeting Reports, please view previously published material at www.current-oncology.com.

Spelling

Use Canadian spelling. In this context, “Canadian” spelling means using “–our” and “–re” word endings (“rigour,” “centre”) and doubled consonants in most verb forms (“signalling,” “modelling”). However, “–ize” and “–yze” are the preferred verb endings (“characterize” not “characterise” and “analyze” not “analyse”), and diphthongs are not used (for example, “hemoglobin” not “haemoglobin” and “diarrhea” not “diarrhoea”). Use the serial comma (sometimes called the “Oxford” comma); item1, item2, and items3.

Abbreviations

Multi-word phrases used frequently (four times or more) in the text may be abbreviated if necessary. Introduce the abbreviation in parentheses after the first occurrence of the phrase, and then use the abbreviation at the second and subsequent appearances [for example, “chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)”, “progression-free survival (PFS)”]. Note that, with respect to introducing and using abbreviations, the abstract, main body of the article, and each figure and table are considered entirely separate entities, and the abbreviation rule applies to each entity separately, except that in the abstract and figures, abbreviations can be introduced even if the abbreviated phrase is repeated only once or twice.

Note that sentences may never begin with an abbreviation. Rewrite to avoid or spell the phrase in full.

Abbreviations for units of measurement and standard scientific symbols (for example, 3 mL, Na, DNA) may be used without explanation, as may the standard abbreviations for the long names of chemical substances (for example, EDTA). Chemotherapeutic regimens may be shown as abbreviations on first (or even only) reference, but list the component drugs in parentheses [for example, FOLFIRI (irinotecan–5-fluorouracil–leucoverin)]. Abbreviate names of tests and procedures that are better known by their abbreviations than by the full name (VDRL test, SMA-12).

Abbreviations used in figures must be defined in the figure legend. In tables, strive for a balance between readability and space-saving through abbreviation. For examples, please view previously published material at www.current-oncology.com.

Units of Measurement

Use the SI system, and its standard symbols, throughout the manuscript. When units other than SI units are widely used, they can be indicated in parentheses after the SI unit. When a unit of measurement is mentioned outside the context of a specific quantity, spell out the full name of the unit (for example, “measured in milliliters”, but “aliquots of 10 mL were centrifuged”). In tables, specify the units for a column or row in the column or row stub rather than in every entry in the column or row.

Dates and Times

All dates are to be presented in the form dd Month yyy: for example, 25 September 2016. Times are to be presented using the 24-hour clock, using “h” as a separator between the hour and the minutes: for example, 8h30, 17h00.

Special Characters

Certain symbols that are frequently used in biomedical publications (Greek and mathematical symbols primarily) do not usually import correctly from word processing files into page layout programs. Authors can feel free to use these symbols, but during the copyediting process, they will be changed into codes that the page compositor can locate in a search-and-replace operation to drop the correct symbols into the laid-out pages. On no account should the codes added by the copyeditor be altered by the author during the author’s copyedit review step. (Some examples of these codes are “xxa” for alpha, “xx>” for “greater than or equals,” and “xxby” for the multiplication symbol.)

Proprietary and Generic Names

Use generic names for all drugs. Include the proprietary name, with the owner’s name and headquarters location in parentheses [that is, city, province|state, country—for example, “trastuzumab (Herceptin: Genentech, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.)”], only if it is more commonly known than the generic name; to differentiate among drug forms; or if a specific trade preparation was used in a study or was involved in an adverse effect. Instruments may be referred to by their proprietary name; the name and headquarters location of the manufacturer must be given in parentheses in the text. Computer programs used for statistical analysis, image analysis, and lab analysis may also be mentioned by proprietary name; again, give the name and headquarters of the manufacturer in parentheses in the text.

Use of English Language

All papers are published in English, and authors who are not fluent in English are advised to seek editorial help before submitting their papers. This will help to ensure that the academic content of the paper is fully understood by the journal editors and reviewers.

References

With some minor modifications, Current Oncology follows the stylistic standard outlined in the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/uniform_requirements.html, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7256/). The Uniform Requirements style is based to a large extent on the standard used by the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) for its databases. Journals titles should be abbreviated according to the style used in the list of Journals Indexed for MEDLINE, posted by the NLM on the Library's Web site; http://www.nlm.nih.gov/tsd/serials/lji.html.

The manuscript’s reference list must be numbered (using Arabic numerals) consecutively in the order in which the references are first cited in the text. Citations appearing in tables and figures must fit into the numbering sequence from the point at which the table or figure is first mentioned in the text.

In text, tables, and legends, reference citations are to be presented as superscripts. Do not use ibid. or op cit.

Reference Recap:

  1. Use the reference style of the Uniform Requirements as based largely on the standard adapted by the National Library of Medicine for its databases.
  2. Number references in the order in which they are first cited in the text, with citations in figures and tables being incorporated into the order at the point where the figure or table is first mentioned.
  3. All citations are expected to appear as superscript numerals.
  4. Provide complete data for each reference.
  5. Cite symposium papers only from published proceedings.
  6. When citing an article or book accepted for publication but not yet published, include the title of the journal (or name of the publisher) and the year of expected publication.
  7. Include citations of unpublished material in the text, not in the references [for example, papers presented orally at a meeting; unpublished work (personal communications, papers in preparation)] and submit a letter of permission from the cited persons to cite such communications.
  8. Include an “available from” note for documents that might not be readily accessible.
Minimum Acceptable Data for Basic References

Print Journal – Full article
Online Journal – Full article
Print Journal – Abstract
Proceedings Book – Abstract
Print Book or Pamphlet
Print Book Chapter
Online Book, Pamphlet, or Book Chapter
Web Site
Newspaper or Magazine Article
Special Formats
Unpublished Material

Print Journal – Full article

Author or authors (for up to 6, include all names; for 7 or more, include 3 names and add “et al.”; for authors acting for group, add “on behalf of the <Group Name>” after author names; for authorship credited to a group, use the group name). Title of article in sentence case. Journal Name Year;Vol:pp–pp.

Examples:
Geomini P, Kruitwagen R, Bremer GL, Cnossen J, Mol BW. The accuracy of risk scores in predicting ovarian malignancy: a systematic review. Obstet Gynecol 2009;113:384–94.

Maggioni A, Benedetti Panici P, Dell’Anna T, et al. Randomised study of systematic lymphadenectomy in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the pelvis. Br J Cancer 2006;95:699–704.

Wirth MP, See WA, McLeod DG, Iversen P, Morris T, Carroll K on behalf of the Casodex Early Prostate Cancer Trialists’ Group. Bicalutamide 150 mg in addition to standard care in patients with localized or locally advanced prostate cancer: results from the second analysis of the early prostate cancer program at median follow up of 5.4 years. J Urol 2004;172:1865–70.

Online Journal – Full article

To the standard information for a print article, add “[Available at: <http://FullURL>; cited Month DD, YYYY]” to the end of the reference.

Example:
Al-Saleh K, Quinton C, Ellis PM. Role of pemetrexed in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, with histology subgroup analysis. Curr Oncol 2012;19:e9–15. [Available at: http://www.current-oncology.com/index.php/oncology/article/view/891/817; cited June 24, 2012]

Print Journal – Abstract

Abstract author or authors (for up to 6, include all names; for 7 or more, include 3 names and add “et al.”; for authors acting for group, add “on behalf of the <Group Name>” after author names; for authorship credited to a group, use the group name). Title of abstract in sentence case [abstract <number>]. Journal Name Year;Vol:pp–pp.

Example:
Lee JS, Park K, Kim SW, et al. A randomized phase III study of gefitinib versus standard chemotherapy (gemcitabine plus cisplatin) as a first-line treatment for never-smokers with advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung [abstract PRS.4]. J Thorac Oncol 2009;4(suppl 1):S283.

For organizations that maintain online archives of published meeting abstracts (for example the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting abstract archive, and the San Francisco Breast Cancer Symposium abstract archive) omit the page number. Instead, add the direct URL to the abstract in the organization’s archive (“[Available online at: <http://FullURL>; cited Month DD, YYYY]”) to the end of the reference.

Examples:
Kwak EL, Camidge DR, Clark J, et al. Clinical activity observed in a phase I dose escalation trial of an oral c-Met and Alk inhibitor, PF-02341066 [abstract 3509]. J Clin Oncol 2009;27:. [Available online at: http://www.asco.org/ASCOv2/Meetings/Abstracts?&vmview=abst_detail_view&confID=65&abstractID=30947; cited May 23, 2012]

Di Leo A, Isola J, Piette F, et al. A meta-analysis of phase III trials evaluating the predictive value of HER2 and topoisomerase II alpha in early breast cancer patients treated with CMF or anthracycline-based adjuvant therapy [abstract 705]. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2008;107:. [Available online at: http://www.abstracts2view.com/sabcs/view.php?nu=SABCS08L_538; cited June 21, 2011]

Proceedings Book – Abstract

Abstract author or authors (for up to 6, include all names; for 7 or more, include 3 names and add “et al.”; for authors acting for group, add “on behalf of the <Group Name>” after author names; for authorship credited to a group, use the group name). Title of abstract in sentence case [abstract <number>]. In: Editors for proceedings book (up to 6, include all names; 7 or more, include 3 names and add “et al.”), eds. Title of Proceedings Book in Title Caps. Proceedings of <Meeting Name>; Conference City, State|Province|Country; Conference Month DD–DD, Year. Publisher City, State|Province|Country: Publisher; Publication Year: pp–pp.

Example:
Bengtsson S, Solheim BG. Enforcement of data protection, privacy and security in medical informatics. In

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